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Here are the latest updates for Changhui Tan's research profile.

Here is the Curriculum Vitae and List of Publications.

 

McKenzie Black and Changhui Tan


Abstract

We consider the pressureless compressible Euler system with a family of nonlinear velocity alignment. The system is a nonlinear extension of the Euler-alignment system in collective dynamics. We show the asymptotic emergent phenomena of the system: alignment and flocking. Different types of nonlinearity and nonlocal communication protocols are investigated, resulting in a variety of different asymptotic behaviors.


 This work is supported by NSF grant DMS #2108264

 

Xiang Bai, Qianyun Miao, Changhui Tan and Liutang Xue


Abstract

In this paper, we study the Cauchy problem of the compressible Euler system with strongly singular velocity alignment. We prove the existence and uniqueness of global solutions in critical Besov spaces to the considered system with small initial data. The local-in-time solvability is also addressed. Moreover, we show the large-time asymptotic behavior and optimal decay estimates of the solutions as \(t\to\infty\).


 This work is supported by NSF grant DMS #1853001 and DMS #2108264

 

Yi Sun and Changhui Tan


Abstract

This paper presents a class of one-dimensional cellular automata (CA) models on traffic flows, featuring nonlocal look-ahead interactions. We develop kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithms to simulate the dynamics. The standard KMC method can be inefficient for models with global interactions. We design an accelerated KMC method to reduce the computational complexity in the evaluation of the nonlocal transition rates. We investigate several numerical experiments to demonstrate the efficiency of the accelerated algorithm, and obtain the fundamental diagrams of the dynamics under various parameter settings.


 This work is supported by NSF grant DMS #1853001 and DMS #2108264
 This work is supported by a UofSC VPR ASPIRE I grant

 

Thomas Hamori and Changhui Tan


Abstract

We study a class of traffic flow models with nonlocal look-ahead interactions. The global regularity of solutions depend on the initial data. We obtain sharp critical threshold conditions that distinguish the initial data into a trichotomy: subcritical initial conditions lead to global smooth solutions, while two types of supercritical initial conditions lead to two kinds of finite time shock formations. The existence of non-trivial subcritical initial data indicates that the nonlocal look-ahead interactions can help avoid shock formations, and hence prevent the creation of traffic jams.


 This work is supported by NSF grant DMS #1853001 and DMS #2108264
 This work is supported by a UofSC VPR ASPIRE I grant

 

Manas Bhatnagar, Hailiang Liu and Changhui Tan


Abstract

This paper is concerned with the global wellposedness of the Euler-Poisson-alignment (EPA) system. This system arises from collective dynamics, and features two types of nonlocal interactions: the repulsive electric force and the alignment force. It is known that the repulsive electric force generates oscillatory solutions, which is difficult to be controlled by the nonlocal alignment force using conventional comparison principles. We construct invariant regions such that the solution trajectories cannot exit, and therefore obtain global wellposedness for subcritical initial data that lie in the invariant regions. Supercritical regions of initial data are also derived which leads to finite-time singularity formations. To handle the oscillation and the nonlocality, we introduce a new way to construct invariant regions piece by piece in the phase plane of a reformulation of the EPA system. Our result is extended to the case when the alignment force is weakly singular. The singularity leads to the loss of a priori bounds crucial in our analysis. With the help of improved estimates on the nonlocal quantities, we design non-trivial invariant regions that guarantee global wellposedness of the EPA system with weakly singular alignment interactions.


 This work is supported by NSF grant DMS #1853001 and DMS #2108264
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